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REPARTI Seminars


The REPARTI Seminars at Université Laval are held on Fridays at 11:30 a.m.
Please see the program for more details.
Dec 15 2017 11:00AM
Seminar
Building and Evaluating Data-Driven Neural Dialogue Systems

 

 

 

REPARTI

MIVIM

Sep 19 2008 11:00AM

Dr. Alexandra Branzan Albu
Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria

Computer vision-based human motion analysis with applications to health care



Abstract

Our society faces major challenges related to its rapidly aging population. The development of new assistive technologies that will support rehabilitation and aging in place is therefore necessary. Computer vision technologies for marker-less human motion analysis offer a promising alternative to marker-based motion capture systems, which are expensive and not portable to non-clinical environments.

In this talk I will provide an overview of ongoing projects in human motion analysis in the ACVA (Applied Computer Vision Algorithms) laboratory at UVic. These projects include, but are not limited to gait modeling, human activity representation, and quantification of human motion performance using visual descriptors.


Alexandra Branzan Albu holds a Bachelor's degree in Electronic Engineering (1992) and a Ph.D. degree (2000) in Electronic Engineering from the Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Romania. In 2001, she joined the Computer Vision and Systems Laboratory at Laval University as a postdoctoral researcher and became an assistant professor at Laval in 2003.

She is currently with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Victoria. Her research interests include computer vision-based human motion analysis and medical imaging.

Dr. Branzan Albu is a professional engineer affiliated to the Province of British Columbia Association of Professional Engineers.


This 45-minute seminar will be given in French at 11:00 a.m.




     
   
   

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